Digital Mapping and the Humanities

In the spring 2016 semester, the CFDE is co-sponsoring a series of workshops and lectures that will deeply examine the growing ways humanities scholars are engaged in cutting-edge digital mapping projects. Throughout the semester, seven scholars—each at different stages of their careers, from PhD candidate to full professor, including two in careers outside the tenure track—will come to Emory to talk and work with faculty and graduate students about their digital mapping and the humanities projects. The projects featured in the series offer the Emory community an opportunity to consider a variety of approaches to the joining of geo-spatial analysis and humanistic inquiry.

During their visits, all seven will each teach a three-hour workshop for graduate students and faculty. Six of the seven visiting scholars will also deliver public presentations of their work.

Digital mapping promises to transform the humanities by offering fresh tools with which to develop research questions, analyze data, and publish findings. Humanists at the forefront of this innovative approach are providing new looks and insights into history, art, photography, soundscapes, cities, and developments in the art market.

Workshops

These three-hour sessions will take place on Tuesdays from 9am until noon. They will be hands on and will take place in a room equipped with individual computers for each participant, up to eighteen people. Graduate students enrolled in Art History 789R: Mapping and Art History will participate in the workshops, scheduled to take place at the course's regular meeting time. Other Emory graduate students and faculty are invited to register for the workshops on a first-come, first-served basis.

The visiting scholars will discuss with the workshop group their research questions, why they turned to digital mapping to answer the questions, how digital mapping has informed their findings, and how they intend to disseminate results. They will also reflect on possibilities and challenges that come with using an emerging method for art-historical study and other humanistic inquiry.

For more information and to register for the workshops, click here. Enrollment capped at 18.

Workshops will take place in the Woodruff Library Room 312 unless otherwise indicated.

Tuesday, 26 January 2016, 9.00 AM-12.00 PM

George Philip LeBourdais

PhD candidate, Department of Art and Art History, Stanford University


Tuesday, 2 February 2016, 9.00 AM-12.00 PM

Nicholas Bauch

Postdoctoral Scholar, Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, Stanford University


Tuesday, 9 February 2016, 9.00 AM-12.00 PM

John Russell

Associate Director, Center for Humanities and Information, Pennsylvania State University 

Russell will reflect on the range and quality of digital humanities projects across the United States and funding for them. This workshop will also be open to other Emory graduate students and faculty interested in digital humanities. *LOCATION TO BE DETERMINED


Tuesday, 16 February 2016, 9.00 AM-12.00 PM

Niall Atkinson

Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Chicago


Tuesday, 1 March 2016, 9.00 AM-12.00 PM

S. Wright Kennedy

PhD candidate, Department of History, Rice University


Tuesday, 29 March 2016, 9.00 AM-12.00 PM

Pamela Fletcher

Professor of Art History, Bowdoin College


Tuesday, 12 April 2016, 9.00 AM-12.00 PM

Ellen Prokop

Associate Photoarchivist, Frick Art Reference Library 

Lectures

All lectures scheduled to take place in the Woodruff Library Jones Room. For more information, click here.

Monday, 25 January 2016, 5.30-7.00 PM

Tracing The Arctic Regions: Mapping 19th-Century Photographs of Greenland

George Philip LeBourdais, PhD candidate, Department of Art and Art History, Stanford University


Monday, 1 February 2016, 5.30-7.00 PM

Enchanting the Desert: Visualizing the Production of Space at the Grand Canyon

Nicholas Bauch, Postdoctoral Scholar, Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, Stanford University


Monday, 15 February 2016, 5.30-7.00 PM

Seeing Sound: Mapping Florentine Soundscapes

Niall Atkinson, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Chicago


Tuesday, 1 March 2016, 5.30-7.00 PM

The Potential of Historical GIS and Spatial Analysis in the Humanities

S. Wright Kennedy, PhD candidate, Department of History, Rice University


Monday, 28 March 2016, 5.30-7.00 PM

Mapping the Commercial Gallery System in Nineteenth-Century London

Pamela Fletcher, Professor of Art History, Bowdoin College


Monday, 11 April 2016, 5.30-7.00 PM

A Modern Old Master? Using Historical GIS To Chart El Greco's Influence on the French Avant-Garde

Ellen Prokop, Associate Photoarchivist, Frick Art Reference Library 

Co-Sponsorship

Through this series of public presentations and focused workshops, Emory students and faculty will investigate fresh methods for study in the humanities and begin to build a community of scholars working on digital mapping in the humanities. In addition to the CFDE, the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship and the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry are originating co-sponsors of the series. The Art History, English, Environmental Sciences, French and Italian, History, Sociology, Spanish and Portuguese Departments as well as the Laney Graduate School, Institute for Quantitative Theory and Methods, and Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program are also co-sponsors. Additional support for the series comes through cost-sharing with the Future of the Monograph in the Digital Era initiative for the visit of Nicholas Bauch, who will deliver a separate presentation related to that initiative. 

Related Articles