Curating Your Career - Past Programs

From Failure to Success: A Practical Guide

March 20, 2017

This program is now available on video.

Rejection and failure are unavoidable aspects of an academic career. But rejection can also be an essential byway on the road to success. Failure can make us stronger and smarter. In this panel, senior faculty from across the university will talk about the grants they didn’t get, the book contract that fell through, roadblocks they ran into when writing and/or researching—and what they gained from those frustrations. Hear their stories and learn how they kept from from getting discouraged.

Panelists:

  • Carlos Del Rio, Hubert Professor and Chair of the Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Emory University School of Medicine, Program Director of the Emory AIDS International Training and Research Program, and co-Director of the Emory Center for AIDS Research (CFAR)
  • Sandra Dunbar, Professor of Nursing and Associate Dean for Academic Advancement, School of Nursing
  • Carla Freeman, Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Senior Associate Dean for Faculty, Emory College
  • Gregory Waymire, Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Accounting, Goizueta Business School

Being an Effective Mentee: Panel Discussion

October 24, 2016

In this informal panel conversation, faculty will discuss how to be proactive as possible as a junior or early tenured professor. Topics will include how to be effective at “managing up,” being very intentional about finding mentors, and connecting with peers to create one’s own structure for support.

Notes from the discussion

Panelists:  

  • Dabney Evans, Assistant Professor of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health
  • Dilek Huseyinzadegan, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Emory College
  • Tene Lewis, Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health
  • Ana Teixeira, Instructor in Spanish and Portuguese, Emory College
  • Camille Vaughan, Assistant Professor of Geriatrics, School of Medicine, 
  • Kate Yeager, Assistant Professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing

The Slow Professor Reading and Discussion Group

2016-17

Read CFDE Associate Director Allison Adams's Chronicle of Higher Education (December 6, 2016) essay on "Helping Professors Find Time to Think."

The increasingly frantic pace of professorial life can drive faculty literally to distraction. How can we counteract the frenzy and bring time to think back into academic life?

The 2016 book The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy, by Canadian English professors Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber, draws lessons from the “Slow Food” movement. They discuss how adopting the principles of the “Slow” movement to academic life can counter the erosion of humanistic education in particular and university life more broadly.
 
The CFDE will host a reading and discussion group of The Slow Professor throughout the 2015-16 academic year. We will meet six times to discuss each of the four chapters, plus the introduction and conclusion of this brief, 90-page book. We will explore the pragmatic suggestions and potential problems of the book by enacting them in a yearlong engagement with the text.  >>more


Continuing On in Retirement: Maintaining a Scholarly Life in the Humanities and Non-Experimental Social Sciences

This program is now available on video.

January 20, 2016

The issues that faculty face when considering retirement are different depending on their field of study. In the humanities and non-experimental social sciences, faculty may wonder about funding, field work, travel, or access to archives. Co-sponsored wiht the Emory University Emeritus College, this panel discussion with three faculty who have recently retired but maintained an active scholarly life will explore some of the more “existential” questions for faculty considering retirement: What might scholarly projects might look like after retirement? In what ways do they change? What can a retired faculty member think about doing in terms of intellectual projects, and how do things change in terms of resources and support? Are there ways in which scholarly engagement might be refocused to new activities?

Speakers: Don Saliers (William R. Cannon Distinguished Professor of Theology and Worship, Emeritus), Ronald Schuchard (Goodrich C. White Professor of English, Emeritus), and Holly York (French, Emerita)


Continuing On in Retirement: Maintaining a Scholarly Life in the Experimental and Clinical Sciences

This program is now available on video.

January 11, 2016

The issues that faculty face when considering retirement are different depending on their field of study. In the experimental and clinical sciences, faculty may wonder about access to lab space, grant funding, and clinical activities. Co-sponsored with the Emory University Emeritus College, this panel discussion with three faculty who have recently retired but maintained an active scholarly life will explore some of the more “existential” questions for faculty considering retirement: What might scholarly projects might look like after retirement? In what ways do they change? What can a retired faculty member think about doing in terms of intellectual projects, and how do things change in terms of resources and support? Are there ways in which scholarly engagement might be refocused to new activities?

Speakers: Al Padwa (Chemistry, Emeritus), Marilynne McKay (Dermatology, Emerita), and Steve Nowicki (Psychology, Emeritus)