Previous Research and Scholarship Workshops and Events

Fulbright Scholar Workshop

March 22, 2019

Presentation and Q&A
Online resources here

The Halle Institute for Global Research and the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence are partnering to host a day of free Fulbright Scholar resource information sessions on Friday, March 22, with Peter Raucci, from Fulbright-IIE. These sessions are intended for Emory faculty interested in applying for a Fulbright Scholar award. 

A presentation and question-and-answer session on these resources will take place from noon to 2:00 p.m. in the Center for Ethics, and boxed lunches will be served. Register online to attend by March 19.


An Introduction to Social Science Research Council Funding Opportunities for Faculty and Graduate Students

Feb 22, 2019

The Center for Faculty Development and Excellence, the Halle Institute for Global Research, and the Institute for Quantitative Theory and Methods are partnering to host a day of free Social Science Research Council (SSRC) resource information sessions on Friday, Feb 22, with Nicole Restrick Levit, a fellowships manager and associate director, SSRC. These sessions are intended for Emory faculty and graduate students interesting in applying for the following:

  • Abe Fellowship Program (https://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/view/abe-fellowship/) Policy-oriented research fellowship which requires that US-based researchers to spend one-third of their fellowship time in Japan.
  • Conflict Research Fellowship (https://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/view/conflict-research-fellowship/) Yearlong support for scholars investigating the drivers of conflict in Somalia, South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, or Syria.
  • Japan Society for Promotion of Science Fellowship (https://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/view/jsps-fellowship/) – a fellowship for 3 months to 2 years research in Japan - open to researchers in the social sciences and humanities within 6 years of receiving the PhD
  • Transregional Junior Scholar Fellowship – InterAsian Contexts and Connections (https://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/view/transregional-research-fellowship/): Support junior scholars (up to five years out of the PhD) as they complete first books or undertake second projects. Since its inception, the intellectual thrust of the program has been the reconceptualization of Asia as an interlinked historical and geographic formation stretching from West Asia through Eurasia, Central Asia, and South Asia to Southeast Asia and East Asia.

Nicole Restrick Levit is the manager of the fellowships office and the assistant director of the Abe Fellowship Program and the Japan Program. She holds a B.A. in modern literary studies from the University of California at Santa Cruz and an M.A. in East Asian Studies from Cornell University. Prior to joining the Council in 2006, Nicole worked in the field of international education, exchange and outreach for five years, first as associate director of the National Clearinghouse for U.S.-Japan Studies, Indiana University, and then as an international programs officer at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan.


Meet the Editor and Agent

TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, APR 9-10, 2018

Emory faculty are invited to Meet the Editor and Agent, an annual event that brings experts in publishing to campus, sponsored by the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence. Please join us on for an illuminating panel discussion and Q&A session with Rachel Vogel, literary agent from Dunow, Carlson & Lerner (New York), and Jason Weidemann, University of Minnesota Press. Our expert guests will discuss trends and expectations for faculty authors in the current environment of scholarly publishing.

Public Panel Discussion

Available on video here

Monday, April 9 • 4:00 pm

Jones Room, Woodruff Library

Visiting editor and literary agent will discuss the changing landscape of scholarly publishing and current trends. Register at this link.

Biographies

Rachel Vogel is an agent at Dunow, Carlson & Lerner, representing a range of nonfiction and select fiction. Rachel has previously worked as an agent at Waxman Leavell, and at Mary Evans Inc. and Lippincott, Massie McQuilkin, where she also handled foreign rights. In addition to her agenting experience, Rachel worked as a book scout for Maria Campbell Associates, where she scouted the American market on behalf of foreign publishers and film producers. Today, she loves working with writers from all areas of expertise (science, history, popular culture, photography) to develop their unique ideas into saleable and accessible books for a general audience. A graduate of UMass Amherst's Commonwealth College, she lives in Brooklyn.

Jason Weidemann is the editorial director of the University of Minnesota Press. He seeks manuscripts that make field-defining interventions in their core disciplines, contribute to interdisciplinary conversations, and communicate to readers beyond the academy, including activists, policymakers, and general readers. His interest in Native and indigenous studies draws on literary studies, the social sciences, legal studies, and education. He also acquires works in cultural and human geography, anthropology, and sociology. Special interests include environmental politics, multispecies ethnography, urban studies, global flows of labor and capital, and Asian studies. Of specific interest are manuscripts that examine the social and racial dimensions of medicine and science. Proposals for translations from Japanese are welcomed, specifically science fiction and critical theory. He is also interested in manuscripts on the social aspects of video games and digital communication. As Chair of the Press’s Journals Program, Jason Weidemann is interested in forging publishing partnerships with new and existing journals based on principles of intellectual independence and a commitment to ethical and equitable partnerships.  

 


Thinking Together: Scholarly Collaborations Series

The frisson of thinking together exists at the heart of collaboration in academic research and writing. But for collaboration to work well, partners must embrace a shared understanding of process as well as product. In this series of programs in 2017-18, faculty are invited to explore the ways collaboration is approached, understood, and manifested in different scholarly environments.

Differences and Partnerships in Scholarly Collaborations

Faculty Panel Discussion

Wednesday, October 18, 2017, at Noon

Jones Room, Woodruff Library 

Collaborations can be successful and productive among scholars at different points in their career trajectories. At the same time, we know that such collaborations can have challenges and grey areas, given differences in authority and power. How do rank, gender, and other forms of difference affect the dynamics among collaborators, especially in the sciences? What are the best approaches to collaborating with students? Speakers will focus on best practices and common challenges in such partnerships. How do issues of authority and responsibility work best among multiple PI’s and co-investigators? What is “managing up?” What are the main considerations in authorship when collaborative research is published?

Panelists:

  • Colleen Kraft, Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (video available)
  • Andres Camacho-Gonzales, Assistant Professor of Pediatric Infectious Disease (video available)
  • Anthony Martin, Professor of Practice, Environmental Sciences (video available)
  • Cassandra Quave, Assistant Professor, Dermatology and Center for the Study of Human Health (video available)

Creative Collaborations in the Humanities

Presentation (video available)

Wednesday, November 1, 2017, at Noon

Jones Room, Woodruff Library

Speaker: Sylvia Miller, Senior Program Manager, Publishing Innovations, and Publications Manager, Humanities Futures, Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University

Miller will discuss what makes a good collaboration in the humanities, drawing on her experiences as manager of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes, program manager at Duke University's Franklin Humanities Institute, co-founder of the inter-institutional Publishing Makerspace working group, and director or coordinator of several international scholarly collaborations funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. How can faculty and institutions structure, create, and support "humanities labs"? What do humanities faculty need to have and know in order to collaborate successfully across disciplines and around themes? 

International Collaborations

Faculty Panel Discussion

Wednesday, February 7, 2018, at Noon

Location: Ethics Center Commons, Room 102

Presented in partnership with the Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives. 

What are the most important things to know for scholars collaborating across continents and cultures? In this session, four faculty from different fields who have collaborative projects in other parts of the world and/or with international partners discuss best practices and advice, common pitfalls to avoid, what they think makes for a great international collaboration, how they found collaborators, and more.

Panelists: 

  • Aryeh D. Stein, Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health
  • Jeffrey Lesser, Department of History, Emory College of Arts and Sciences
  • Deborah Bruner, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
  • Gonzalo Vazquez-Prokepec, Department of Environmental Sciences, Emory College of Arts and Sciences

Talking to the Media About Science

A Public Scholarship Workshop for Faculty

October 4, 2017

Presented in partnership with the Rollins School of Public Health 

As entire bodies of research are dismissed as hoaxes and public debates grow over the politicization of science, scientists are increasingly being called upon to explain their work in the media. In this panel, two communications professionals skilled in media training for scientists and two scientists who have looked closely at how science is represented in the media will offer their best advice for researchers speaking publicly about their work through the news.

Panelists:

  • Myra Oviatt, Director of Communications, Rollins School of Public Health
  • Carol Clark, Senior Science Communicator, University Communications
  • Cecile Janssens, Professor of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health
  • Scott Lilienfeld, Professor of Psychology, Emory College of Arts and Sciences

Meet the Editors and Agent

Emory faculty are invited to Meet the Editor and Agent, an annual event that brings experts in publishing to campus, sponsored by the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence. Please join us on for an illuminating panel discussion and Q&A session with Patrick Allen, acquisitions editor, University of Georgia Press; Walter Biggins, executive editor, University of Georgia Press; and Rob McQuilkin of Massie & McQuilkin, Literary Agents (New York). Our three expert guests will discuss trends and expectations for faculty authors in the current environment of scholarly publishing, focusing in particular on finding the right press for your book project.

Biographies

Patrick Allen is acquisitions editor at the University of Georgia Press, specializing in "trade" titles intended for general (non-specialist) readers. He works on book series with the Southern Foodways Alliance, Georgia River Network, and the Library of American Landscape History. Before joining UGA Press, he co-founded Hill Street Press, a small press focusing on titles of regional interest.

Walter Biggins is an executive editor at the University of Georgia Press. His writing has been published in RogerEbert.comThe Quarterly ConversationGlide MagazineBookslut,The Baseball Chronicle, and other periodicals. With Daniel Couch, he is the author of the forthcoming book, Bob Mould’s Workbook (Bloomsbury, 2017).

A graduate of Phillips Academy and Columbia University, Rob McQuilkin (agent) started out in publishing at Warner Books, where he acquired the paperback rights to books including Primary Colors, by Anonymous (Joe Klein). He left Warner Books for Anchor Books/Doubleday, where, as Editor, he acquired books by and/or worked closely with writers including Anita Hill (Speaking Truth to Power), Phillip Lopate (Totally, Tenderly, Tragically), and Lois Gould (Mommy Dressing), also acquiring the paperback rights to bestsellers such as Jon Krakauer’s Into Thin Air. Rob cut his teeth as an agent while working with Ike Williams and Jill Kneerim at The Palmer & Dodge Agency (later known as The Hill & Barlow Agency and then Kneerim & Williams at Fish & Richardson), before leaving to start his own agency, which, from 2003 to 2016 was known as Lippincott Massie McQuilkin and, as of January 2017, has been Massie & McQuilkin, Literary Agents.

Among the agency's clients are Roxane Gay; Kelly Link; Peter Ho Davies; Dan Chaon; Amber Dermont; and Lydia Millet. Rob himself specializes in fiction, memoir, history, and cultural criticism. Among his own clients within the agency are: Pulitzer Prize-winner and Two-term U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey; Internationally bestselling and prizewinning novelist Nickolas Butler; Director of African American Studies at Emory Carol Anderson; Pulitzer Prize-winning Essayist, Poet and Novelist Annie Dillard; PEN Open Award-winning poet and Director of the NYPL's Schomburg Center Kevin Young; Pulitzer Prize-winning Poet and Essayist Gregory Pardlo; and National Jewish Book Award-winner Shulem Deen, whom The Jewish Week has called "The poet laureate of ex-Chasidim." He also represents literary estates including those of Barbara Tuchman and Eudora Welty.


An Introduction to Fulbright Scholar Grants for US Faculty and Professionals

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Presentation Powerpoint available at this link.

The Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives (GSI) and the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence (CFDE) are partnering to host a day of free Fulbright information sessions on Wednesday, Feb 15, for Emory faculty and professionals interesting in applying for Fulbright grants.

Andrew Reiss, Assistant Director of Outreach at the Institute of International Education, which administers the Fulbright Scholar Program, will be on campus to give a presentation on the grants for U.S. faculty and professionals. A limited number of brief, one-on-one morning meeting slots for faculty who have questions about the process will also be available. Attendees will learn about opportunities to teach and conduct research abroad and get tips on preparing Fulbright grant applications.

The deadline for applications to the 2017-18 Fulbright Scholar Program is Aug. 1, 2017. The program provides approximately 800 teaching and research grants each year to U.S. faculty and professionals in a variety of fields. Grants are available in more than 125 countries. For more information, contact Kevin Kelly, assistant director of the Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives.

The CFDE also offers multiple online resources and advice for applying for a Fulbright Scholar Grant.


International Funding Opportunities: A Panel Discussion for Faculty

Tuesday, Nov 15

Noon-1:00 p m

Jones Room, Woodruff Library

Co-Sponsored by the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence and the Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives

More and more faculty are securing international funding for research. Support is available either domestically for international work or from international agencies .

During this hour-long panel discussion, three faculty members who have received international funding such as Fulbright awards, DAAD (the German Academic Exchange Service)funding, and support from sources internal to Emory will speak on their experiences and offer advice for success they have gleaned in the process.

The panelists are

Jonathan Strom, Professor of Church History; Associate Dean of Faculty and Academic Affairs; Director of International Initiatives, Candler School of Theology (DAAD Award, 2010)

Uriel Kitron, Goodrich C. White Professor and Chair, Department of Environmental Sciences, Emory College (Emory Global Strategy and Initiatives funding for joint research with Brazilian colleagues, 2016)

Jenny Foster, Associate Professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing

Academic Program Coordinator of International Health, Lillian Carter Center for International Nursing (Fulbright Grant, 2015)

Contacts:

Allison Adams, Associate Director, CFDE, aadam02@emory.edu

Kristi Hubbard, Senior Associate Director, GSI, Kristi.hubbard@emory.edu


April 18-19: Meet the Editor and Agent

Emory faculty are invited to Meet the Editor and Agent, an annual event that brings experts in publishing to campus, sponsored by the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence. Please join us on for an illuminating panel discussion and Q&A session with Eric Schwartz, editorial director, Columbia University Press, and Jessica Papin, literary agent with Dystel and Goderich Literary Management (New York). Our two expert guests will discuss trends and expectations for faculty authors in the current environment of scholarly publishing

Eric Schwartz is editorial director of Columbia University Press. Before joining the press in September 2014, he was senior editor for sociology and cognitive science at Princeton University Press, a job he had held since 2008. During that time he established a new list in cognitive science and revitalized the sociology list, turning it into one of the top lists in the field. Before moving to Princeton he was psychology editor at Cambridge University Press. He started his career at Springer as a manufacturing assistant and Oxford University Press as manufacturing controller. He became production controller at Cambridge and moved into the editorial department in 2006. Along the way he earned a Ph.D. in political science from the New School for Social Research. His BA, in international relations, is from the University of Delaware. Eric has been active with the Association of American University Presses and the Bookbinder’s Guild of New York. He has started a sociology list at Columbia University Press and is building upon the existing list in neurobiology and behavior.

This presentation is now available on video.

Jessica Papin is an agent with Dystel and Goderich Literary Management in New York. She first joined DGLM in 2003, after spending eight years as an editor at Warner Books (now Grand Central). In 2004, she moved to Egypt, where she spent three years working for the American University in Cairo Press. Upon her return to the United States, she rejoined Dystel and Goderich. With a background on both sides of the desk, she loves working collaboratively with clients to shape and refine their work. Her stay in the Middle East has given her an abiding interest in the history and politics of the region, as well as the broader Islamic world. She is interested in plot-driven literary and smart commercial fiction, and narrative non-fiction across a range of subjects, including history, medicine, science, economics, and women’s issues. In every case, she looks for passion, erudition, and storytelling skill. A wry sense of humor doesn’t hurt.

This presentation is now available on video.

Faculty authors will have opportunities to meet one-on-one with Mr. Schwartz and Ms. Papin on Tuesday, April 19, to discuss individual projects and proposals. This is a tremendous opportunity to make an impression and connection that will help faculty get their work into publication. To meet with one or the other, please submit a short summary or abstract of your book project to Allison Adams (aadam02@emory.edu) no later than April 7. Mr. Schwartz and Ms. Papin will review the summaries before their visit to campus. This brief description of your book should be two pages maximum and include some abbreviated biographical information. Please also include contact information. A limited number of these slots are available and they tend to fill up quickly, so make your appointment request early (first come, first served).


April 5: An Introduction to German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Funding Opportunities for U.S. Faculty

This Presentation is now available on video.

Tuesday April 5 | 12 noon – 1:00 pm | Jones Room, Woodruff Library

The Center for Faculty Development and Excellence and the Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives partner to present an information session for faculty on opportunities through the German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst, or DAAD). DAAD is a private, publicly funded, self-governing organization of higher education institutions in Germany. DAAD promotes international academic relations and cooperation by offering mobility programs primarily for students and faculty but also for administrators and others in the higher education realm.

DAAD offers opportunities that take scholars and researchers from many different disciplines and fields of study to German universities, libraries, archives, laboratories, etc., for research stays, guest lectureships, and more. Each year DAAD, its regional branch offices, its information centers, and DAAD professors around the globe provide information and financial support to more than 120,000 highly qualified students and faculty for international research and study.

Peter R. Kerrigan is the deputy director of DAAD New York and the director of marketing and development for the organization. In this presentation, you will learn about teaching and research opportunities through DAAD and hear tips on preparing your application to DAAD.

Free boxed lunches will be served. To register for this program, please visit this link.


November 12: Connect with Research

The Center for Faculty Development and Excellence (CFDE) and the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship (ECDS) are partnering to present “Connect with Research,” a showcase of a variety of ways faculty in humanities and humanities-related fields are using digital technology as part of their research.

Four faculty presenters will talk for about 10 minutes about their digital scholarly projects. 

Presenters:

Abdullahi An-Na'im, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law, will talk about his blog, “The Future of Sharia,” which takes the controversial concepts from his research and writing and opens them up to global public debate. The blog builds on his 2008 book, Islam and the Secular State, in which he tackles complex issues about government secularism and Sharia (Islamic law).

Cheryl Crowley, Associate Professor in the Department of Russian & East Asian Languages & Cultures, will discuss her project titled Hacking Haiku. In partnership with the ECDS, she is working to digitize a travel journal written by the Japanese poet Tagami Kikusha in the nineteenth century. Kikusha wrote haikai, the genre now called haiku. She and the ECDS team have been creating a database of the hundreds of poems, linking them to the GPS coordinates of the sites the poet visited and other information.

Jesse Karlsberg, Post-doctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities Publishing, ECDS. Karlsberg is editing a digital critical edition of Joseph Stephen James’s 1911 Original Sacred Harp, a companion to the Centennial Edition he edited published by Pitts Theology Library and the Sacred Harp Publishing Company this February. The digital edition uses Readux, a tool for annotating and publishing digital critical editions developed by a team from ECDS and the library’s software development team with which he has served as lead scholar.
This presentation is now available on video.

Michael A. Elliott, Professor of English, will speak on the future of the monograph in the digital era. At the request of the Andrew W. Mellon foundation, a group of Emory faculty met over the course of last year to consider issues related to the digital publication of long-form scholarship in the humanities. Professor Elliott will summarize the findings of that group and its report to Mellon, including key questions that remain unresolved as university presses adopt new digital publication formats.
This presentation is now available on video.


Rewriting is the Essence of Writing

This program is now available on video.

Wednesday, September 23, noon-1:00 pm
Jones Room of Woodruff Library

In the words of William Zinsser, author of On Writing Well“rewriting is the essence of writing well—where the game is won or lost." This workshop will cover good practices and techniques for revising and editing your own work: what to look for, how to read and “listen” to your work, habits and patterns common to scholarly writing. This session will be led by Allison Adams, associate director of the CFDE and an editor for 25 years, along with Hank Klibanoff, the James M. Cox Professor of Journalism, co-author of The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation, and winner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in history.

To register for this workshop, visit this link

Clinical Research Boot Camp

Monday, March 16 | 8am to 4:30 pm
Woodruff Health Sciences Center Auditorium

Deadline to register: February 21

Clinical researchers from across Emory University are invited to join us for a full day workshop designed to provide participants with an in-depth overview of the major components involved in clinical research. The session will include didactic lectures and small group breakouts. A networking event to follow.

  • Study Design
  • Conflict of Interest
  • Case Reports
  • Mentoring Trainees
  • Securing Funding
  • Manuscript Writing & Publishing
  • And more!

Registration is available here. Deadline: February 21.

Event brought to you by the School of Medicine Office of Faculty Development and the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence.

Fulbright Workshops

This program is now available on video (click the "Fulbright" category)

Monday, March 16

Individual Meetings with Fulbright Program Officer
9:00 - 11:00 am
Center for Faculty Development and Excellence, 216 Woodruff Library
Register by March 6 (see details below)

An Introduction to Fulbright Scholar Grants for US Faculty and Professionals
Presentation and Q&A
12:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Woodruff Library, Jones Room (3rd floor)
Free boxed lunches will be served. Register by March 12 >>


Fulbright Recipients Panel Discussion
2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Jones Room

The Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives (GSI) and the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence (CFDE) are partnering to host a day of free Fulbright information sessions on Monday, March 16 for faculty and staff interesting in applying for Fulbright grants. Cate McCraw, a program officer with the Fulbright Scholar Program, will be on campus to give a presentation on Fulbright Scholar grants for U.S. faculty and professionals. In addition, there are two new offerings this year: brief one-on-one meetings for faculty who have questions about the process and a Fulbright alumni panel discussion. Attendees will learn about opportunities to teach and conduct research abroad and get tips on preparing Fulbright grant applications. The following sessions are open to faculty and staff:

  • Brief one-on-one meetings with McCraw will run from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. in the CFDE (216 Woodruff Library). She will review draft proposal summaries before her visit and provide guidance and feedback to strengthen them. To sign up for a time slot, email a short project abstract (and a draft proposal if available) to Allison Adams, associate director of the CFDE, by Friday, March 6. The description should be no more than two pages and include a brief bio and contact information.
  • A presentation and question-and-answer session on Fulbright Scholar grants will take place from 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. in the Jones Room on the third floor of Woodruff Library, and boxed lunches will be served. Register online to attend by Thursday, March 12.
  • Past Fulbright grant recipients will share their experiences and take questions about putting together a successful application during a panel discussion from 2:30 – 3:30 p.m., also in the Jones Room. Panelists include Professor of History Joe Crespino, Associate Professor of Nursing Jenny Foster, and Business Librarian Lee Pasackow. Registration is not required.

The deadline for applications to the 2016-17 Fulbright Scholar Program is Aug. 1. The program provides approximately 800 teaching and research grants each year to U.S. faculty and professionals in a variety of fields. Grants are available in more than 125 countries. For more information, contact Kevin Kelly, assistant director of the Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives.

Meet the Editor & Agent

This event is now available on video (click the "Scholarly Publishing" category).

Public Discussion
Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015 | noon
Room 162, Center for Ethics

Individual Short Consultations for Faculty
Wednesday, Apr 8, morning and afternoon (times to be assigned, see below to request a consultation)

Emory faculty are invited to Meet the Editor and Agent, an annual event that brings experts in publishing to campus, sponsored by the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence. Please join us on for an illuminating panel discussion and Q&A session with Eric Zinner, associate director & editor-in-chief at NYU Press, and Sam Stoloff, vice president and senior agent at the Frances Goldin Literary Agency in New York. Our two expert guests will discuss trends and expectations for faculty authors in the current environment of scholarly publishing, including the growth and development of digital media projects.

Faculty authors will have opportunities to meet one-on-one with Mr. Zinner and Mr. Stoloff on Wednesday, April 8, to discuss individual projects and proposals. This is a tremendous opportunity to make an impression and connection that will help faculty get their work into publication. To meet with one or the other, please submit a short summary or abstract of your book project to Allison Adams (aadam02@emory.edu) no later than March 25. Mr. Zinner and Mr. Stoloff will review the summaries before their visit to campus. This brief description of your book should be two pages maximum and include some abbreviated biographical information. Please also include contact information. A limited number of these slots are available and they tend to fill up quickly, so make your appointment request early (first come, first served).

Eric Zinner is associate director & editor-in-chief at NYU Press. He publishes scholarship in American studies, cultural studies, literary criticism, media studies, communication, and American cultural history. His books have won multiple National Jewish Book Awards (2009 in Jewish Studies; 2009 finalist in Jewish Studies; 2006 in Modern Jewish Thought), the American Book Award, two Katherine Singer Kovács Book Awards (highest prize in cinema and media studies), the Alan Merriam Prize (highest prize in ethnomusicology), the best first book prizes of the Modern Language Association and the American Studies Association, the Saul Viener Prize (best work American Jewish history), and the Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies, along with numerous additional prizes.

Sam Stoloff is senior agent, vice president and principal at the Frances Goldin Literary Agency in New York, where he has worked since 1997. He represents a wide range of authors of adult fiction and nonfiction, including academics, journalists, activists, graphic artists, poets, fiction writers and memoirists. Among his many interests are literary graphic fiction and nonfiction, literary fiction, works on environmental sustainability, books on legal affairs and the justice system, the history of American military intervention, the history of race in America, the history of science and technology, poverty and economic inequality, and books on food culture and history. He has an MFA in creative writing and a Ph.D in American studies, both from Cornell University. Founded in 1977, the Frances Goldin Literary Agency is a full-service literary agency based in New York City’s Greenwich Village, representing quality fiction and serious, often controversial nonfiction, with a particular focus on books that have a progressive political orientation.

Please contact Allison Adams (aadam02@emory.edu) for more information.

How to Build a Book Platform

This program is available on video: Ken Carter and Megan McRainey

Noon, Nov 14, 2014
Jones Room, Woodruff Library

Ken Carter (Psychology, Oxford College) and Megan McRainey (Media Relations). 

An important aspect of a nonfiction book proposal is its platform. Publishers often want to know that you’ve created and cultivated a base of people interested in your topic and that you can communicate effectively in multiple media outlets (such as radio, television, and newspapers). In this talk, Megan McRainey, from Emory Media Relations, will give helpful advice at dealing with such non-academic audiences, and Ken Carter will share his experience in building his book platform from scratch.

Visit of Robert Dreesen, Senior Commissioning Editor in Politics and Sociology, Cambridge University Press

This program is available on video (behind Emory ID/password)

Public Lecture: 
Thurs, October 16, 4:00 pm, Room 162, Center for Ethics
 
One-On-One Meetings with Faculty: 
Thurs, October 16, and Fri, October 17, CFDE
 

Emory faculty are invited to attend the public lecture of Robert Dreesen, Senior Commissioning Editor in Politics and Sociology at Cambridge University Press. Mr. Dreesen has also been involved with the press's digital publication projects. Please join us for his talk on general trends and expectations in the current environment in scholarly publishing in politics and sociology, as well as Cambridge UP's endeavors and goals in digital publishing, followed by an illuminating Q&A session. 

Faculty authors in the fields of political science and sociology will have opportunities to meet one-on-one with Mr. Dreesen on both Thursday October 16 and Friday October 17. To meet with him, please submit a short summary or abstract of your project to Allison Adams (aadam02@emory.edu) no later than Tuesday, October 14. Mr. Dreesen will review the summaries before his visit to campus. This brief description of your book should be two pages maximum and include some abbreviated biographical information. Please also include contact information. A limited number of these slots are available and they tend to fill up quickly, so make your appointment request early (first come, first served).

Copyright for Authors

Tuesday, Sept 9, 2014 | 3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
Joseph W. Jones Room, Woodruff Library

Lecture and Q&A with an expert in copyright law in research and scholarly publishing

Lisa A. Macklin, director of the Scholarly Communications Office in Woodruff Library, will take faculty through an overview of what every author should know about copyright law, from permissions to the "bundle" of rights afforded to authors over their own work to copyright transfer agreements from publishers. Come with questions or send questions in advance to Lisa at lisa.macklin@emory.edu.

Lisa Macklin came to Emory in 2005 and was appointed the first director of the Scholarly Communications Office (formerly the Libraries Intellectual Property Rights Office) in 2007. In this role she works with faculty, students, and staff on the application of copyright law to teaching, research, and publishing. She holds a law degree from Georgia State University, an MA in Library and Information Science from the University of South Florida, an MA in English from Texas Woman's University, and BA in English from the University of South Florida.

Meet the Agent
Public Discussion
Tuesday, Apr 8, 2014 | 4:00 p.m.
Jones Room, Woodruff Library

This program is available on video.

*Originally this event was to include Robert Dreesen, an editor from Cambridge University Press. Mr. Dreesen has had to cancel his visit to Emory next week. We are hoping to reschedule in Fall 2014.

Individual Short Consultations for Faculty
Wednesday, Apr 9, Throughout the Day (times to be assigned, see below to request a consultation)

Emory faculty are invited to Meet the Editor and Agent, an annual event that brings experts in publishing to campus, sponsored by the Scholarly Writing and Publishing project of the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence. Please join us on for an illuminating Q&A session with Cecelia Cancellaro of Idea Architects - Creative Book and Media Development Agency. Our expert guest will discuss trends and expectations for faculty authors in the current environment of scholarly publishing.

Faculty authors will have opportunities to meet one-on-one with Ms. Cancellaro and Mr. Dreesen on Wednesday, April 9. To meet with one or the other, please submit a short summary or abstract of your book project to Allison Adams (aadam02@emory.edu) no later than March 25. DEADLINE EXTENDED TO MARCH 26. Mr. Dreesen and Ms. Cancellaro will review the summaries before their visit to campus. This brief description of your book should be two pages maximum and include some abbreviated biographical information. Please also include contact information. A limited number of these slots are available and they tend to fill up quickly, so make your appointment request early (first come, first served).

Cecelia A. Cancellaro has more than twenty years of publishing experience, most recently as the cofounder of Idea Architects, a creative book development agency. She provides a wide-range of book and publishing related services including shaping book ideas, developing books and book proposals, editing manuscripts, agenting, writing, and providing guidance and expertise throughout the publication process. She began her career as an editor at Routledge Press and was also an editor at Schocken Books in the Knopf Group at Random House. Her goal has always been to bring intellectually and politically important work to a wide readership. She has published many award-winning and paradigm-shifting books in a variety of areas close to her heart, including feminism, history, race, and legal studies.

Copyright for Authors - Rescheduled

Tuesday, Sept 8, 2014, 3:30 p.m. (This event was postponed from February 2014 due to inclement weather and university closures.)
Joseph W. Jones Room, Woodruff Library

Lecture and Q&A with an expert in copyright law in research and scholarly publishing

Lisa A. Macklin, director of the Scholarly Communications Office in Woodruff Library, will offer an overview of what every faculty author should know about copyright law and intellectual property rights, from permissions around images and other works to the "bundle" of rights afforded to authors over their own work. Macklin joined Emory in 2005 and was appointed the first director of the Scholarly Communications Office (formerly the Libraries Intellectual Property Rights Office) in 2007. In this role she works with faculty, students, and staff on the application of copyright law to teaching, research, and publishing. She holds a law degree from Georgia State University, an MA in Library and Information Science from the University of South Florida, an MA English from Texas Woman's University, and BA in English from the University of South Florida.

Scholarly Writing in the Digital Milieu
Monday, Mar. 17, 2014 | 3 p.m.
Math and Science Center E208 (NOTE ROOM CHANGE)
Joint presentation and Q&A with two experts in digital scholarship

As scholars increasingly move their work to the web, and with an estimated third of all scholars now active on social media, conversations that previously took place within campus walls are now open for the world to pitch in. The benefits of using the digital milieu for scholarly communication have been cited, among myriad others, as democratization, widening participation, and engaging new audiences on a global level. But these rapid changes come with challenges, including the way that these new modes for communication change the nature of scholarly writing itself. How does a project go from Twitter to a blog post to an article to a book? Or some other form?

Adeline Koh is director of the Digital Humanities Center and and assistant professor of literature at Richard Stockton College. Her work spans the intersections between postcolonial studies and the digital humanities, 19th/20th Century British and Anglophone Literature and Southeast Asian and African studies, and games in higher education. Koh runs the postcolonial digital humanities website and tumblr blog with Roopika Risam. She is also a core contributor to the Profhacker Column at the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Roopika Risam is assistant professor of world literature and English education at Salem State University. She works to address the intersections of postcolonial studies and minority discourse in the United States and the role of digital humanities in mediating between the two. Risam has contributed to Postcolonial Studies @ Emory, a digital humanities project that provides a home for postcolonial studies on the web, and she runs the postcolonial digital humanities website and tumblr blog with Adeline Koh. She is currently serving on the Modern Language Association's Delegate Assembly.

Clinical Research Boot Camp
Friday February 28
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Health Sciences Research Building Auditorium

The CFDE and the School of Medicine Office of Faculty Development join efforts.

Join us for a full day workshop designed to provide participants with a comprehensive overview of the major components involved in clinical research.

  • Study design
  • Working with the IRB 
  • Case reports
  • Data management
  • Securing funding
  • Team science
  • Manuscript writing and publishing
  • More

Registration deadline is February 5, 2014.

Grant Writing in the Humanities
Co-sponsored with the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry and the University Research Committee
Friday, January 31, 2014 | 3:00 p.m.
Joseph W. Jones Room, Woodruff Library
Half-hour panel discussion followed by individual meetings with interested faculty

Faculty in humanities fields are especially encouraged to attend a half-hour panel discussion with Jason Rhody (via Skype), a senior program officer in the Office of Digital Humanities at the National Endowment of the Humanities, and who will speak to what the NEH is looking for and qualities in a successful proposal; Yanna Yannakakis, associate professor of history, who has an impressive track record of securing grants; and Vincent Cornell, Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Middle East and Islamic Studies, who has served on multiple NEH review panels.

In the following hour and a half of the program, the three panelists will individually speak one-on-one with faculty who might have an idea for a grant, or perhaps a proposal in progress, to give feedback and advice. Faculty are invited to sign up in advance for these ten-minute consultations (first come, first served). To do so, please send an email to Allison Adams (aadam02@emory.edu) by January 28 that briefly summarizes your grant proposal or concept, its current stage of development, and some abbreviated biographical information (no more than 500 words).

Workshop: Writing Book Proposals and Queries for Trade Presses and Agents

Thursday, Feb 9, 2012

Noon to 1:15 p.m.
White Hall 200 
Do you have a book in the works or an idea brewing? Literary agents will be on campus in April for a presentation and individual meetings with faculty, so now is the time to craft your proposal Bring your questions about the basics of book proposals for literary agents to this brown-bag lunch discussion, hosted by Elizabeth Gallu, associate director of the Author Development Program in the CFDE.

Contact: Elizabeth Gallu, 404-727-6692, egallu@emory.edu.

Workshop: Pitching and Placing your Op-Ed

Wednesday, Feb 29, 2012
Noon to 1:15 p.m.
Emory Center for Ethics Rm 162 
Co-sponsored by the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence and the Center for Women at Emory as the first in a series of follow-up sessions to the January Op-Ed Workshop, which aims to increase the volume of women faculty voices in the public sphere. Two Emory media relations experts, Nancy Seideman and Elaine Justice, will offer tips and advice on pitching and placing an op-ed piece in major media outlets. This event is open to all faculty and graduate students. Lunch will be provided for up to 25 people. Please RSVP to Roopika Risam at rrisam@emory.edu. Please visit the CFDE calendar for more information.

Workshop: Stories from the Op-Ed Front Lines
Monday, March 26, 2012
Center for Ethics
Noon-1:15 p.m.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence and the Center for Women at Emory as the second in a series of three follow-up sessions to the January Op-Ed Workshop, which aims to increase the volume of women faculty voices in the public sphere. Three Emory faculty members—Drew Westen, Professor of Psychology; Deborah Lipstadt, Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish History and Holocaust Studies and Hank Klibanoff, James M. Cox Professor of Journalism and Pulitzer Prize winner—will share their experiences and advice as op-ed contributors in major national media outlets. This event is open to all faculty and graduate students. Lunch will be provided for up to 25 people. Please RSVP to Roopika Risam at rrisam@emory.edu.

Event: Meet the Agents
Apr 3-4, 2012
Noon to 1:15 p.m. on Tues, Apr 3 (public talk)
Apr 3-4: Brief, individual meetings with authors
Jones Room Woodruff Library (public talk)
Emory Conference Center (individual meetings)
Please join us for an illuminating discussion on public scholarship and writing for a wider audience. Esteemed literary agents Jill Kneerim and David Patterson have helped to catapult the writing careers of numerous scholars and other authors of serious fiction and nonfiction. During the public talk on April 3rd, they will reflect on trends in publishing and take questions.  

Emory faculty authors may also request a one-on-one meeting with either or both agents.  We will begin accepting requests for meetings on January 23, 2012 and these appointments will be confirmed by mid-March.  Spaces are limited and assigned on a first-come-first-serve basis. By March 9, 2012, authors who wish to schedule individual meetings should submit a brief description of their book projects (1-3 pages, maximum) to Elizabeth Gallu. The agents will review these proposals before the individual meetings in April. 

For information, to schedule a meeting, and to RSVP for the public talk contact:  Elizabeth Gallu, Associate Director of the Author Development Program in the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence at 404-727-6692 or egallu@emory.edu.