CFDE Teaching Fellows

Introducing the 2018-19 CFDE Teaching Fellows

The CFDE Teaching Fellows Program supports teaching in the undergraduate curriculum as part of wider effort to bolster the undergraduate academic experience at Emory. This year-long program starts in summer and is open to all fulltime faculty teaching in undergraduate schools. Each of the fellows receives funding to develop a project and share it with their colleagues. 

We expect to call for proposals for the 2019-20 round of teaching fellows in mid-Spring 2019.

The six CFDE Teaching Fellows for 2018-19 are

Rowena Elliott, Associate Clinical Professor, School of Nursing will work with baccalaureate nursing students to identify a topic of concern and/or interest in the older adult population (50+) and then work in groups (5-10) to develop teaching materials specifically targeted to older adults.

Davide Fossati, Lecturer in Computer Science, Emory College will investigate the challenges and benefits of using peer evaluation. Topics will include reliability, accuracy, bias, and discouraging students from “gaming the system.”

Joyce Ho, Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Emory College will investigate how to create an active and engaged course with more than 50% participation without sacrificing content and how to best generate interactive content.

Ann Horrigan, Assistant Clinical Professor, School of Nursing will create 3-4 “patients” who experience multiple illnesses at the same time, but illnesses that are added to the patient one week at a time, allowing the student to bring forward what they learned the previous week and combine it with new material in the current week and see how disorders affect one another. 

Linda Merrill, Senior Lecturer, Art History, Emory College will explore the idea of the introductory survey to find out how to solve the problem of “coverage” and memorization that plague the survey approach.

Florian Pohl, Associate Professor of Religion, Oxford College will develop a new course on Islamophobia and Racism conceptualized around questions of leadership and social justice. Studying the intersectional challenges to anti-Muslim racism, the course will introduce students to different strategies people use to resist anti-Muslim racism and ask how we as citizens and leaders can involve ourselves in that resistance.

Please direct questions about this program to Donna Troka at: dtroka@emory.edu