Faculty Mentorship Network

The CFDE Faculty Mentorship Network aims to provide all Emory faculty confidential opportunities for support and conversation with colleagues, by providing access to multiple mentors. More than 180 Emory faculty from a wide range of schools and departments have volunteered to support their colleagues in areas such as teaching observations, guest lecturing, research, scholarship, university service, public scholarship, and general professional development.

Who May Use the Network?

Faculty at any stage of their careers are welcome to request access to a mentor from the list of volunteers.  Mentoring is life-long: ust as faculty mentor students and trainees at all levels, faculty at all levels can benefit from mentoring as well. Likewise, no one person can provide all of the mentoring expertise you may need: we are happy to connect you with multiple mentors on multiple topics.

To Find a Faculty Mentorship Network Member

To be connected to a mentor on a particular topic, please contact CFDE director Eric Weeks (erweeks@emory.edu).

If you wish to be added to the mentor database, please fill out this brief form.

 

We can connect you with mentors to help with:

Teaching

  • Visiting your class to observe your teaching. Optionally, they can write a letter summarizing their observations suitable for inclusion in a teaching portfolio for promotion.
  • Advice on scholarship of teaching & learning / educational research.
  • Observe an excellent classroom teacher / general discussion about teaching
  • Engaged learning course design
  • Curriculum design & development

Research

  • Willing to read a manuscript draft / grant proposal draft
  • Substantive feedback on research to colleagues in the same/similar field (with a wide variety of fields represented in our database)
  • Help provide access to funding, publication, and other professional opportunities
  • Whether and how to seek literary representation (an agent)

Public Scholarship

  • Reading a draft of an op-ed column
  • Advice on working and talking with the media
  • Advice on writing trade books / public scholarship

Applying for fellowships

  • NSF, NIH grants
  • Alexander von Humboldt fellowship
  • American Institute of Indian Studies grants
  • Cottrell Scholar
  • Doris Duke Foundation
  • Dumbarton Oaks
  • Foundation Brocher fellowship
  • Fulbright
  • Getty Research Institute
  • Guggenheim fellowship
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
  • Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton fellowship
  • Kress Foundational fellowship
  • National Endowment for the Arts
  • National Endowment for the Humanities
  • New England Foundation for the Arts grants
  • Radcliff Institute for Advanced Study fellowship
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • Wenner-Gren

General Career Advice

  • Balancing teaching, scholarship, and service
  • Balancing work and family life
  • Guidance to a newly promoted professor navigating this next stage of your career
  • Guidance to a newly promoted full professor
  • Career advice for lecture-track faculty
  • Providing a safe space for faculty in underrepresented groups

Read more about mentoring networks

Felten, Peter, H-Dirksen L. Bauman, Aaron Kheriaty, Edward Taylor. Transformative Conversations: A Guide to Mentoring Communities among Colleagues in Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2013.

June, Audrey Williams. “The Invisible Labor of Minority Professors.” Chronicle of Higher Education, November 8, 2015.

Rockquemore, Kerry Ann.The Black Academic's Guide to Winning Tenure - Without Losing Your Soul.Boulder: Lynn Rienner, 2008.

Rockquemore, Kerry Ann.  “A New Model of Mentoring.” Inside Higher Education. July 22, 2013.

Rockquemore, Kerry Ann. “Why Mentor Matches Fail.” Inside Higher Education. February 3,2016.  (includes a link to the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity’s mentoring map.”

Sorcinelli, Mary Deane, and Jung Yun. “From Mentor to Mentoring Networks: Mentoring in the New Academy.”Change Magazine, 2007.