Summer Teaching Intensive


Each August, the Summer Teaching Intensive consists of eight modules led by Emory faculty and staff. All faculty, graduate students, post-docs and staff are welcome. You can come for one module or come for them all.

2022 Summer Teaching Intensive

Tuesday, August 9 & Wednesday, August 10, 2022

9:00am-4:30pm

The Center for Faculty Development and Excellence is once again hosting our two-day Summer Teaching Intensive. Sessions will be hybrid (available both in person and on Zoom -- you choose what format works best for you).

The intensive consists of eight sessions led by Emory faculty and staff. All faculty, graduate students, post docs, and staff are welcome. In person space is limited, and once capacity is met, remaining participants will have to Zoom in. You can come for only one session, or you can come for them all.  Session descriptions and a schedule are attached. You will also find the session descriptions in the sign up form below.

Register

Contact Donna Troka, Director of Diversity and Inclusive Pedagogy, for more information.

Schedule

Tuesday, August 9 

Wednesday, August 10 

9:00-10:30 

Session 1 
Incorporating Public Scholarship into Teaching 

Sarah Higinbotham, Jeannie Rodriguez & Tom Rogers 

9:00-10:30 

Session 5  
Active Learning and Inclusive Pedagogy in the Classroom 
Alicia Lane & Liesl Wuest  

 

10:30-10:45 

Break 

10:30-10:45 

Break 

10:45-12:15 

Session 2 
Joys and Practices of Interdisciplinary Co-Teaching: Tales from the Classroom 
Kim Loudermilk & Peter Wakefield 

10:45-12:15 

Session 6 
Poll Everywhere and Teaching with Technology: Level-Up Your Course  

Dana Smith Bryant, Kathy Hayes & John Willingham  

12:15-1:15 

Lunch 

12:15-1:15 

Lunch 

1:15-2:45 
 

Session 3 

Strategies For Supporting Student Mental Health and Well-Being 

James Raper & Jane Yang 

 

1:15-2:45 

Session 7 
What Does “Rigor” Mean While Teaching During a Pandemic? 

Bree Ettinger, Molly McGehee, Michael Martin, and Hugh Stoddard 

 

2:45-3:00 

Break 

2:45-3:00 

Break 

3:00-4:30 

Session 4 

Alternatives to Decolonizing the Classroom 
Kelly Duquette, Rita Nahta & Donna Troka 
 

3:00-4:30 

Session 8 

Gender Diversity and Pronouns on Campus 

Alicia Lane & Donna Troka 

2022 Session Descriptions

Tuesday August 9, 2022 

Session 1 (9:00-10:30) 

Incorporating Public Scholarship into Teaching 

Sarah Higinbotham, Jeannie Rodriguez, and Tom Rogers 

Incorporating public scholarship into teaching can welcome students into an approach to collaboration, intellectual and community exploration, and applied thinking that most find deeply enfranchising. In addition to fostering civic responsibility and public knowledge, public scholarship can highlight and create connections between the university and communities that are often opaque to students. In this session, we will discuss our experiences with public scholarship in teaching, principles for collaborative projects, and opportunities at Emory.  

Session 2 (10:45-12:15) 

Joys and Practices of Interdisciplinary Co-Teaching: Tales from the Classroom 

Kim Loudermilk & Peter Wakefield 

 The intellectual growth and pedagogical experimentation involved in fully collaborative co-teaching not only models interdisciplinarity and life-long learning for students, but builds lasting community among faculty colleagues. Long-time ILA members, Kim Loudermilk and Peter Wakefield, will share ideas and experiences from the ILA’s many forms of co-teaching – including Sidecar courses, the Learning through INclusive Collaboration (LINC) initiative, and regularly co-taught courses such as those involving ILA Interdisciplinary Faculty Fellows and ILA frame courses.  

Session 3 (1:15-2:45) 

Strategies For Supporting Student Mental Health and Well-Being 

James Raper & Jane Yang 

Presenters will discuss recent trends regarding student mental health and well-being, opportunities to holistically support student needs in and out of the classroom, and resources available to faculty. Faculty will be invited to share their experiences with student well-being needs.  Specific attention will be paid to the impact of the pandemic on mental health, heightened academic performance anxiety, and the intersections between diversity/equity/inclusion/belonging and well-being. 

Session 4 (3:00-4:30) 

Alternatives to Decolonizing Your Classroom  

Kelly Duquette, Rita Nahta, and Donna Troka 

In DEI and faculty development circles conversations and trainings about how to “decolonize” your syllabus or curriculum abound. For many, to “decolonize” is to take into account how power does and does not circulate through a space, but for others (especially Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang, authors of “Decolonization is Not a Metaphor”) decolonization is focused on “the repatriation of Indigenous land and life.” Using this work, Nayantara Sheoran Appleton’s work “Do Not Decolonize...If You Are Not Decolonizing” and others, we will workshop other ways to name what we are trying to do when we attempt to address power in our classrooms and curriculums. 

Wednesday, August 10, 2022 

Session 5  (9:00-10:30) 

Active Learning & Inclusive Pedagogy in the Classroom 

Alicia Lane & Liesl Wuest 

 During this session, we will explore how active learning and inclusive pedagogy are interrelated student-centered practices that promote learning and long-term retention. We will consider and brainstorm strategies to increase class engagement and inclusivity in any classroom environment. By the end of this session, the participants will have drafted a plan to integrate active learning and inclusive practices in their course(s). 

Session 6 (10:45-12:15) 

Poll Everywhere and Teaching with Technology: Level-Up Your Course  

Dana Smith Bryant, Kathy Hayes, and John Willingham 

Technologies such as Canvas and Zoom have enabled academic continuity over the last couple of years, and this summer is a great time to reflect on that and figure out how to bring the best of these tools forward into ongoing pedagogical practice. In this session we will demonstrate some of the ways you can use the technologies supported by Teaching and Learning Technologies—and Poll Everywhere in particular—to make better use of the time you have in class and improve your students' experience of the course between meetings. 

Session 7 (1:15-2:45) 

What Does 'Rigor' Mean When Teaching During a Pandemic? 

Bree Ettinger, Molly McGehee, Michael Martin, Hugh Stoddard 

Teaching while actively in a pandemic has forced many to reconsider their pedagogy. What does it mean to “care” for our students? How do we maintain flexibility while also still holding students accountable? And how do we maintain rigor in our courses when the academic landscape is continually shifting (virtual to in person to hybrid and so on). In this session we aim to continue to grapple with the many understandings of rigor (difficulty, preparation, assessment) and to begin to discuss what is “enough” when we think about various standards across our campus. 

Session 8 (3:00-4:30) 

Respecting Gender Diversity 

Alicia Lane & Donna Troka 

This session aims to prepare faculty, staff, and students to better serve genderqueer, trans, and non-binary students. We will define each of these identities and discuss the differences between gender, sex, and sexual orientation. Finally, we will provide an overview of specific pedagogical practices and complementary tools available at Emory that instructors can utilize to make their classrooms and workspaces more inclusive and welcoming to people who are gender non-conforming.